PMP Certification: Control Procurements (based on PMBOK® Guide, 6th Edition)


  • WHAT Control Procurements Is. Control Procurement implies monitoring the relationship between buyer and seller, ensuring that both parties are meeting all of their obligations—as required by the procurement contract, and  closing all contracts used in the project—either according to the documented terms or conditions, or as a result of non-performance.
  • WHY Control Procurements Is Important. As the contract may be looked at as a plan, the Control Procurement process ensures that the procurement process complies both with the procurement management plan and with the terms and conditions contained within the negotiated contracts and agreements. Formal procurement closure results in closing all contracts used in the project, either according to the documented terms or conditions, or as a result of non-performance.
  • WHEN Control Procurements Is Executed. The Control Procurements process occurs for a given contract at predefined intervals throughout the project, whenever a vendor provides goods and services to the project. It may also be performed ad hoc, as requested or needed. Procurements are closed at the end of each contract.
  • HOW Control Procurements Operates.
pmp 2018 control procurements pmbok guide 6th edition tipsographic

Control Procurements 101

What Does Control Procurements Involve and When Do You Perform It in a Project Life Cycle?


  • WHAT Control Procurements Is. Control Procurement implies monitoring the relationship between buyer and seller, ensuring that both parties are meeting all of their obligations—as required by the procurement contract, and  closing all contracts used in the project—either according to the documented terms or conditions, or as a result of non-performance.
  • WHY Control Procurements Is Important. As the contract may be looked at as a plan, the Control Procurement process ensures that the procurement process complies both with the procurement management plan and with the terms and conditions contained within the negotiated contracts and agreements. Formal procurement closure results in closing all contracts used in the project, either according to the documented terms or conditions, or as a result of non-performance.
  • WHEN Control Procurements Is Executed. The Control Procurements process occurs for a given contract at predefined intervals throughout the project, whenever a vendor provides goods and services to the project. It may also be performed ad hoc, as requested or needed. Procurements are closed at the end of each contract.
  • HOW Control Procurements Operates.
InputsTools and techniquesOutputs
  1. Project management plan
    • Requirements management plan
    • Risk management plan
    • Procurement management plan
    • Change management plan
    • Schedule baseline
  2. Project documents
    • Assumption log
    • Lessons learned register
    • Milestone list
    • Quality reports
    • Requirements documentation
    • Requirements traceability matrix
    • Risk register
    • Stakeholder register
  3. Agreements
  4. Procurement documentation
  5. Approved change requests
  6. Work performance data
  7. Enterprise environmental factors
  8. Organizational process assets
  1. Expert judgment
  2. Claims administration
  3. Data analysis
    • Performance reviews
    • Earned value analysis
    • Trend analysis
  4. Inspection
  5. Audits
  1. Closed procurements
  2. Work performance information
  3. Procurement documentation updates
  4. Change requests
  5. Project management plan updates
    • Risk management plan
    • Procurement management plan
    • Schedule baseline
    • Cost baseline
  6. Project documents updates
    • Lessons learned register
    • Resource requirements
    • Requirements traceability matrix
    • Risk register
    • Stakeholder register
  7. Organizational process assets updates

Source: PMBOK® Guide, 6th ed., Chapter 12, section 12.3, p. 492.

Control Procurements Key Terms

What Are the Key Terms to Fully Understand the Process of Controlling Procurement?


  • Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR). A technique for reaching a fair settlement – mediation, arbitration, or litigation – in the event of a disagreement that the contracted parties cannot resolve via direct negotiation.
  • Claim. A dispute about the amount charged or the work done against the contract brought by one party against another.
  • Claims Administration. A tool for documenting, monitoring, and managing any disputed cost or change made by either party to the contract.
  • Closed Procurements. A formal written notice that the contract has been completed and closed out,  sent by the contract administrator to the seller.
  • Constructive Change. An undocumented change to the contract ordered by the buyer – through either action or inactions – without issuing a formal change order.
  • Contract Administration. A technique for using the internal systems to maintain contract compliance.
  • Early Termination of Contracts. Three main reasons for a buyer to terminate a contract before deliverables completion:
    • Termination by mutual agreement – both parties agree that the contract should be canceled
    • Termination for cause – the seller has breached or is about to breach the contract
    • Termination for convenience – the buyer no longer wants the work done.
  • Procurement Audits. A formal review of how both buyer and seller have carried out procurement processes and contracts as per approved documentation, to collect lessons learned.
  • Procurement Performance Reviews. A quality management process that compares the seller’s performance and progress against the agreed contract, to evaluate the seller’s ability to meet the requirements of the contract.
  • Records Management System. A tool used to record, store, and distribute contract documentation, including correspondence.

Control Procurements Tips

project management professional certification 2018 rapid review free online course tipsographicWhat Are the Best Tips to Answer Correctly the PMP Certification Exam Questions on Control Procurements Process?


  • Aspects of Procurements Closure. Procurements are closed:
    • Legally – statement of work completed and deliverables accepted
    • Administratively – terms and conditions of contract followed and procurement documentation archived
    • Financially – payments made.
  • Audit Vs. Inspections. You audit processes and inspect deliverables (or products).
  • Closed Project or Phase Vs. Closed Procurements. Projects not performed under contract do not require a formal procurement closure process but projects with many procurements have many procurement closures. On the other hand, all projects do require the Close Project or Phase process and it only happens at the end of the project or phase.
  • Contract Interpretation of Entire Agreement Clause. In accordance with the entire agreement clause, the contract supersedes any prior agreements the contracting parties might have made with regard to the subject of the contract. On the PMP exam, therefore, you need to remember that a requirement not in the contract does not have to be met, even if it was agreed upon prior to signing the contract.
  • Formal Record of Contract Changes. Any and all changes to the procurement contract need to be recorded formally and in writing to reflect the formal nature of the contract.
  • Performance Review Vs. Audit and Inspections. Performance reviews are about the work and focus on the agreed processes contained within the negotiated contract. Audits and inspections are about the processes and deliverables.
  • Roles and Responsibility in Contract Change. Depending on the size of an organization, the procurement manager may be the only person with authority to sign and approve any change to the negotiated contracts.
  • Roles and Responsibility in Contract Closure. Since contracts are legal documents, the contract administrator is the person who formally closes out contracts, once informed of the contract project work completion by the project manager.
  • Roles and Responsibility in Contract Monitoring. All parties to the contract – buyer and seller – are equally responsible for carrying out work to ensure that the terms and conditions of the contract are being fulfilled.
  • Time Is of the Essence. A contract clause that indicates that on-time delivery is mandatory and, therefore, contractually binding.

Click here for a detailed analysis of each project management process group and knowledge area.

SOURCES: Project Management Institute (2017). A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide). 6th ed. Newtown Square: Project Management Institute.

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